About your Search

20130401
20130430
SHOW
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 42
CNNW 33
KQEH (PBS) 26
CSPAN 18
SFGTV2 17
CSPAN2 14
KGO (ABC) 14
KNTV (NBC) 6
KPIX (CBS) 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
FBC 4
KRCB (PBS) 4
KTVU (FOX) 4
WJLA (ABC) 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 237
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 238 (some duplicates have been removed)
in memphis, tennessee. 40 years ago, dr. martin luther king jr. was shot down and murdered right here on this balcony where i'm standing. the greatest civil rights leader in our nation's history, killed before his dreams could be realized. the alleged assassin, a small-time criminal on the run. yet to this day questions still linger and fester, and even some of dr. king's closest aides believe the full story has yet to be told. we will try. ♪ he was an american martyr. a man who broke through the barriers of segregation with the philosophy of nonviolence. only to be shot down by a hidden gunman before his time. >> we had to change the world. >> 40 years later i walked to the tomb of dr. martin luther king jr. with his longtime friend and aide, andrew young. >> free at last. free at last. thank god almighty, i'm free at last. do you think that's the appropriate thing to put there? >> for him, yeah. >> yeah? from his first days in the civil rights movement, dr. king lived under the shadow of death. his house bombed in the montgomery bus boycott, followers killed in birmingham and selm
to the tomb of dr. martin luther king jr. with his longtime friend and aide, andrew young. >> free at last. free at last. thank god almighty, i'm free at last. do you think that's the appropriate thing to put there? >> for him, yeah. >> yeah? from his first days in the civil rights movement, dr. king lived under the shadow of death. his house bombed in the montgomery bus boycott, followers killed in birmingham and selma. he was stabbed once in harlem at a book signing. >> when they removed the knife blades, they left a scar in his chest shaped like a cross. >> a cross he saw in the mirror each day when he got up. >> he said, every morning when i brush my teeth i know this day might be my last, so i'm ready for whatever comes any day of my life. >> he joked about death with his inner circle. >> he'd always say, they are going to be shooting at me, but one of you will be jumping in front of the camera to take the bullet for me. and he said, i'll appreciate it, and then i'll preach the best funeral you've ever heard or anybody ever heard. then he'd start preaching. preaching your funeral. he
. thank you for joining us on the conversation about the moral courage of dr. king coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. take a on april -- tavis: on april 12, 50 years ago, martin luther king allowed himself to be arrested and put in the birmingham, alabama jail cell where he read a newspaper that quoted moderate what energies as saying that thewere extreme and untimely. at the time, he wrote an eloquent letter in response. sociology professor jonathan rieder has taken a closer look at that pivotal document in a new o'connell the "gospel of treating -- in a new look called "gospel of freedom." we start by asking what it was that made you want to dissect this let
to the motel where dr. king had been shot. >> he went to find the landlady. >> i asked her who was renting this room, and she went and got a receipt book and gave me the name. and if i remember right, john willard or something like that. i went down to the car and put out a broadcast on john willard in a white mustang. >> information we have on the subject is a young white male well dressed, possibly in a late-model white mustang north on main street. >> it was already too late. the police dispatcher, vince hughes. >> main street was not cordoned off for probably two minutes. >> the first instinct had been to cordon off the lorraine hotel. most shootings involve arguments at close range, so police raced toward the victim, and precious time was lost. >> in the 25 years i spent on the police department, that was the only occasion i can remember where we had a sniper. >> murders committed by complete strangers are incredibly hard to solve, unless the killer makes his own mistakes. not only did that rifle have ray's fingerprint on it and no one else's, this empty shell casing was in the gun. o
we're going to see a lot of, right? dr. king, the celebrity of dr. king and the "i have a dream" speech, right? maybe there will be some mention of the complexity of the march on washington, the labor unions and the labor activists who actually made it possible, who actually did all the organizing like bay yard rustin. maybe we'll hear about the full name of the march on washington which was the march on washington for jobs and freedom, and maybe we'll even hear about the kennedy administration's horror about this march. they didn't want this to happen. they were concerned that it would just lead to violence to the point where president kennedy shut down the federal government other than for essential personnel the day that this occurred in '63. but i'm pretty certain that the commemoration's mostly going to focus on dr. king and "i have a dream." we all know the speech, i'm sure most of us can recite large chunks of it, especially toward the end, and, you know, it's a great speech. it's optimistic, it's hopeful, it's king at his best when it comes to the delivery and the cadenc
. eric, let me start with you. do you think dr. king would think blacks in america have reached the promise land today? >> well, i would hope that he would think that racism in america has at least declined dramatically from the days -- i remember a speech -- i was listening to a speech today from rfk announcing to a group of people he was speaking to that very moment that dr. king was assassinated, and the speech said something to the affect of "i hope all of the black people in the audience aren't angry at all white people right now because look at me. my brother was shot by a man with a gun who happened to be white as well. ". i hope we are at a point in history where we move on. >> he was outside on the back of a pick up truck, kennedy exprkts crowd in front of him all black did not know dr. king was shot. they announced -- he announced it to him. it was because of bobbie kennedy. he was able to say, i lost a brother too. dana, what do you think? do you think the promise land is there as far as dr. king was concerned? >> i don't think if any of us quite get there. i think th
. >> that was the great dr. martin luther king on the eve of his assassination 45 years ago today. he was killed on april tourth, 1968 on a motel balcony in memphis, tennessee. he knew even the night before he died he wasn't going to live a long life on this earth. what he did not know the mark he would leave on the world forever . eric, let me start with you. do you think dr. king would think blacks in america have reached the promise land today? >> well, i would hope that he would think that racism in america has at least declined dramatically from the days -- i remember a speech -- i was listening to a speech today from rfk announcing to a group of people he was speaking to that very moment that dr. king was assassinated, and the speech said something to the affect of "i hope all of the black people in the audience aren't angry at all white people right now because look at me. my brother was shot by a man with a gun who happened to be white as well. ". i hope we are at a point in history where we move on. >> he was outside on the back of a pick up truck, kennedy exprkts crowd in front of him all black
men in particular. michael cody was with dr. king in memphis in the days leading up to the assassination and knew him as few others have. jerry mitchell is an investigative reporter and the preemptive on civil rights cases. before we get to them and martin luther king jr.'s legacy let's get caught up on the political headlines today. in connecticut just 111 days after the slaughter of children at the sandy hook elementary school, the gun debate is over. with the stroke of the pen connecticut governor signed into law one of the most strictest gun laws on the books. it is the country's own system to track offenders and the ban now includes high capacity magazines. it's a start for parents who lost children in the shoot shooting. >> i can't tell you how much it means to us that our voices have been heard. we said from the outset that we want newtown to be known not for tragedy but for transformation. this law marks that turning point. >> michael: it's so effective when you hear the parents speak. governor malloy made it clear there is still so much to be done in other
abernathy, the one and only ms. juanita abernathy. dr. king called them his favorite -- called him his favorite preacher, the pastor emeritus of the baptist church in cleveland and one of the pre-emflent ministers of our history, the -- preeminent ministers of our history, the reverend otis marks jr. one of the leading figures of the civil rights movement who was in the trenches for the last 50 years, unparalleled in black history, honored to have everend c.t. goodyear. and of course the the founder and president of the rainbow push coalition, reverend william augustus jones augustus junior and justice john scott and went on to found operation push, ran for president and has been a guiding force to all of us. our mentor and on this occasion , i put him on that side so he could, for just two hours, the the young man on the podium again. [applause] reverend jeffrey lewis jackson. [applause] don't mess with me, i put you over here and your piano and again. mannd you'll be an old again. [laughter] .ou will age 40 years and one we will be joined momentarily by reverend joseph lowry who also
on such a great month. recent -- yesterday congresswoman barbara lee talked about dr. martin luther king and his dream and some of the issues that we were dealing with over 40 years ago are some of the same issues that we are dealing with today. and i'm so honored to have dr. claiborne carson here today to talk to us about some of those issues. he is unmatched in terms of his expertise about dr. king and has made sure that his dream and his words and the education that we have from dr. king stays alive for generations to come. so, this is truly an amazing event today. dr. king in 1967 asked, where do we go from here? and today we're still asking that same question. where do we go from here? well, we still have people suffering in our community, people in the african-american community. where do we go from here when we have lost numbers of african americans in san francisco? where do we go from here? well, i'll tell you where we go from here. (applause) >> we change policy of the city. we change policy, and we start to be progressive, truly progressive about the policies we push to make african a
up now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: her breakthrough role was opposite denzel washington in trading day and has gone on to make her mark with johnny depp to matt damon and is now co- starring with ryan gosling and bradley cooper in a movie called "the placed beyond the pines." about fathers, sons, and the consequences of the decisions they make. navigating a life that she -- did not exactly turn out as she hoped. >> it has been over a year. >> i have reason. i did not know what to do. >> you do whatever you need to do. >> what are you going to do? >> i am going to do what i have to do. i am going to school. i will take care of jason. i work here. that is what i am doing.
of my friends in dr. king's inner circle that everyone was jealous that he was dating you. >> who was jealous? is your interview. maybe dr. king himself for all we know. how did that happen? after thispened was amazing and event, we all stayed there. remember where it was, but we were in a little group of people talking. we were so wired. tavis: you had to be. >> that encompassed all of that. people walking, taking buses. it was thrilling. you know what was wonderful? you really believed in the human race. all cynicism and went out the window. it was such a healthy thing for everybody involved. even those read about it and were just as thrilled about this happening. otherand i and a few people sat and talked. we had some drinks. i found him very good-looking. eyes. hazel eyes -- hazel i love this manner. he was very gentle and sweet and funny. that was that. and i was at another demonstration a week later, and there he was again. there she was again. this time we stayed longer and had a hamburger or something, and we began to become interested in each other. i remember one part in
up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: kim jong un inherited the military first policy that seeks to destabilize the region. despite sanctions, north korea continues to develop a nuclear arsenal. the former ambassador to the philippines and asia expert richard solomon is a senior rand is to two. dodge this is a timely issue to look at. the korean war and it with an , now is the .roliferation tavis: what makes this different? the middle of a leadership transition. the comments targeting us, the hostility level that has been raised. the way to look at this situation is the fact that the north koreans are facing a fundamental choice. a militarized regime that has fall
. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. tomart committed $2 billion fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. yourd by contributions to pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. > for more information on no one plays fast talking and take charge characters better than jeremy piven. his role as the always aggressive hollywood super agents just about to find entourage -- defined "ent ourage." now he plays a character that went to england and turned the cultural norms upside down by just about inventing the modern department store as we know it. it is part of the pbs masterpiece on sunday nights. let's take a look at the clip. >> you steal from the store, you steal from yourselves. i started off as an errand boy. i earned a dollar 50s to week. to aay they promoted me stock boy ibm year cried. when they gave me the key to open a store in the morning, that i
'm still praying that his dream comes true." coming up later in the show, i'll talk to dr. king's son and hear how we are fighting and honoring his father's dream. but first we want you to share what your thoughts are and your memories of dr. king. please head over to facebook and search "politicsnation" and "like" us to join the conversation that keeps going long after the show ends. very logical thinker. (laughs) i'm telling you right now, the girl back at home would absolutely not have taken a zip line in the jungle. (screams) i'm really glad that girl stayed at home. vo: expedia helps 30 million travelers a month find what they're looking for. one traveler at a time. expedia. find yours. >>> the state of texas is on alert. investigators are trying to figure out who was behind the murder of two prosecutors killed within two months. today, nearly 2,000 people attended the memorial service for the latest victims killed over the weekend, kaufman county district attorney mike mcclellamcclella mcclelland and his loving wife cynthia. governor perry paid tribute to their life today. >> pe
by two ji yepts giants in the m. they marched side by side with dr. king. stay with us. welcnew york state, where cutting taxes for families and businesses is our business. we've reduced taxes and lowered costs to save businesses more than two billion dollars to grow jobs, cut middle class income taxes to the lowest rate in sixty years, and we're creating tax free zones for business startups. the new new york is working creating tens of thousands of new businesses, and we're just getting started. to grow or start your business visit thenewny.com it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. >>> have you joined the "politicsnation" conversation on facebook today? the controversy over president o
years after his assassination, naacp president been jealous is here to talk about dr. king's legacy. [ male announcer ] at charles schwab, we've committed to setting the bar high by going low. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 like offering schwab etfs tdd# 1-800-345-2550 with the lowest operating expenses tdd# 1-800-345-2550 in their respective lipper categories -- tdd# 1-800-345-2550 lower than ishares tdd# 1-800-345-2550 and vanguard. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 and with all our etfs commission-free tdd# 1-800-345-2550 when traded online in a schwab account, tdd# 1-800-345-2550 it leaves our investors with more money to invest. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 something they've come to count on with us. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 so as investors continue to set their portfolio goals high, tdd# 1-800-345-2550 we help keep their costs of investing low. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 give us a call and open an account today. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 carefully consider prospectus information, including tdd# 1-800-345-2550 investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 request a prospectus by calling schwab at 800-4
be more than just luster. >> a bay area man helped inspire dr. martin luther king's i have a dream speech. stay with us. >>> san francisco has some of the whistle blowers. >> city will have to pay 750,000s skdz clear the whistle blower's name in public. it's a story abc 7 news i team exposed three years ago. >> dr. ker filed because he was laid off after blowing the whistle at misspending at the hospital. the person described what a great loss he had been to laguna honda station. a highly unusual move at the health commission meeting. to setsel a wrongful termination lawsuit the head of laguna honda had to read the wording on a plaque honoring a whistle blower. >> the plaque will say in recognition of derek kerr for contributions in laguna honda 1989 to 2010. >> it was forced out of her. it doesn't come from her heart. the fact she had to do it is vind indication they didn't get away with smearing and trying to bury me. >> in an i team investigation three years ago, dr. kerr blew the whistle on at bus of the gift fund meant for patients. it's supposed to pay for comforts, a cold soda from
of the and all k memorial. here we are on sunday 45 years ago 1968 that dr. king was gunned down at the lorraine motel on the balcony. he went down to memphis that week to stand with sanitation workers are simply trying to organize a local union, 17 '07, when we cover the protest in wisconsin for young people do think now issues are very great it was much more black and white back then i think people should think again i think it was founded 1932 in wisconsin and people were wisconsin -- protesting? dr. king died for that right and most people don't realize they know the "i have a dream" speech but don't realize he was speaking giving the famous address i may not make it, the mountaintop address he was there helping them to simply organize. one year to the day before he died april 4th april 4th, 1967, at riverside church, dr. king gave another address that did not get as much attention after he died. they replay every year on his birthday a federal holiday that was hard fought for by people all over the country and state by state a think the hampshire and arizona were the last to recognize dr. k
that awful day in memphis. >>> 45 years ago tonight the reverend dr. martin luther king, jr., was assassinated. on a motel balcony in memphis. a previously unpublished life magazine photo shows his open briefcase as he left it in his motel room that day. so many people were forever changed by that visit to memphis. he was there, after all, to support striking sanitation workers. tonight ann curry has the story of two who were there. >> reporter: memphis, the spring of 1968. 1300 sanitation workers on strike against unsafe working conditions. the reverend martin luther king, jr., standing with them. >> memphis has gotten by for a long time with numerous injustices where black people are concerned. >> reporter: king's own advisers urged him to skip memphis, fearing violence. and there was. alvin turner, now 79, was there. >> he took that billy club, and he popped me right there. >> reporter: cleo smith, 70, was too. >> people getting beaten, fire extinguishers turned on them. >> reporter: turner says the job paid just 70 cents an hour, but that wasn't the worst of it. >> i had
months and it has the gop shaking in their boots. >>> and 45 years ago tonight, dr. martin luther king gave the final speech of his life, the mountaintop speech. why it still inspires us today. stay with us. >>> have you joined the "politicsnation" conversation on facebook yet? we hope you will. everybody was talking about president obama's decision to give back 5% of his pay to stand in solidarity with federal workers facing furloughs because of automatic budget cuts. terry says, "it's a gesture that shows he cares about people." craig says, "i'd rather have no furloughs." i agree. vincent says, "congress should follow his lead." that's not a bad idea. >>> coming up, more on selling the president's agenda. but first, we want you to join the "politicsnation" conversation. please head over to facebook and "like" us to join our community and get all of the latest news even after the show ends. >>> president obama's taking the fight for his agenda to the people. three months into his new term, he knows how hard it is to get things done z we knew from the beginning that change wouldn't be
of people. >> jackie robinson came before dr. king and refused to sit in the back of the bus and refused to get up and was prosecuted for it before rosa parks. >> ten years before rosa parks. >> yeah. >> he was -- i don't think people really realize how huge jackie robinson was. not only did he integrate baseball, not only did he integrate sports, he integrated society. >> yeah. >> he was huge. >> i was listening to george will this morning. he said jackie robinson was the second most important african-american figure in history. and i was like, who was number one? >> probably dr. king. >> has to be dr. king. is it dr. king or the person who was president who would be barack obama? but without -- >> without dr. king, there would not be an obama. you know, you can make the case either dr. king and jackie robinson were 1a paand 1b. >> good stuff. thank you, jackie robinson. >> thank you. >> we stand on the shoulders of giants. >>> a song about racial harmony now turning into comedy fodder. next, hear and see how much fun "saturday night live" had with the duet that features brad paisley an
young and dr. king's grandson dr. martin luther king join us to talk about voting rights and gun violence. >>> let me finish with this. nine out of ten americans support background checks. why doesn't congress? and this is "hardball." the place for politics. sorry. sore knee. blast of cold feels nice. why don't you use bengay zero degrees? it's the one you store in the freezer. same medicated pain reliever used by physical therapists. that's chilly! [ male announcer ] bengay zero degrees. freeze and move on. >>> would ronald reagan support marriage equality? his daughter thinks so. patti davis says reagan likely would have supported marriage for gay couples. while she never discussed it with her dad, she says he probably would have bucked his party on the issue for three reasons. hollywood acting career. close friendship with a lesbian couple who cared for pat tirks, and ron. and government intrusion into people's private lives. textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy.
. was assassinated down in memphis. andrew young and dr. king's grandson dr. martin luther king iii join us to talk about voting rights and gun violence. >>> let me finish with this. nine out of ten americans support background checks. why doesn't congress? and this is "hardball." the place for politics. as your life changes, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your investments as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you fine-tune your personal economy. start today with a free one-on-one review of your retirement plan. >>> let me finish with this. nine out of ten americans the hollywood acting career and close relationship with patty and ron and general opposition to government intrusion in people's private lives. we'll be right back. book ahead and save up to 20 percent at doubletree.com, so you can sit back, relax and enjoy. doubletree by hilton. where the little things mean everything. arrival. with hertz gold plus rewards, you skip the counters
at the age of 15. my folks can't seem to get in trouble. dr. mengele. rosa parks and martin luther king jr. inspired me to find a way to get in the way. i was so inspired the 1956 at the age of 16, with my brothers and sisters and cousins at the public library and troy, alabama trying to get library cards. trying to check out books. i never went back to that library until july 5th, 1998 with my buck, "walking with the wind." [applause] hundreds of blacks and white came. we had a wonderful program. food, something to eat, some to drink. at the end of the program, they gave me a library card. it says something that the distance we've come in the progress made. some of you in my book, "walking with the wind" and "across that bridge," i try to tell the story of steve inspired to move my feet, to move my body and hair to the philosophy and discipline of mind violent before any seven, before any stand another theater, and a march come from selma to montgomery for freedom ride or the march on 10, we prepared ourselves. we studied philosophy and the economy attempted to do in south africa. they ci
the country on the edge of their seats last night. >>> i've seen the promised land. >> that speech, dr. king's last speech was 45 years ago tonight. dr. king was dead the next day. about his assassin james earl ray, on our website tonight is a link to new pictures and recordings, primitive black and white videotape technology at the time chronicling the reading of his rights on an airplane, his arrival at jail, even a strip search, a medical exam. it's now been restored and the new clearer version is available for screening. >>> a couple of farewells in the news tonight. jane henson has died. she was jim henson's wife and collaborator. as a puppeteer and designer of so many of the muppets, they were really the muppets parents, in addition to raising five of their own. the muppets were born in this building right next to jimmy fallon's studio, in fact. if you visit us at 30 rock, you will see the pipes in an old preserved steam closet that jim henson made into characters which later became the muppets. he died in 1990 at 53. jane henson was 78. >>> in the world of sports the loss this week of
me to the back, because we were facing dr. king, and the sea of wanting, manying, needing, faces, of them wearing the uniform of was particular time, which coveralls in denim. that is where i met james foreman, and we became involved. you met james foreman, and you became romantically involved. prior to that you had already been involved with marlon brando, who you were not speaking to. ofwe had a tumultuous kind relationship for almost eight a big-timehe was philanderer. i always feel like people collude. you be my daddy, and i will be your little girl. that kind of thing. i became subservient to marlon, because that is the type of man i always chose, a man who was more powerful, and his celebrity was thrilling. here i am. i can at least by association the powerful for the time i am with him for dinner or at the theater. that ended in a serious attempt at suicide on my part. i could not bear the humiliation i kept putting myself through. correct them and say, it could not have happened without me. i feel sorry for myself. i was a rather helpless creature then, but it could not h
about latinos, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [applause]tavis: my name is tavissmiley, and i am honored to be the monitor of this conversation, called latino nation, behind the numbers. the numbers are clear. his community is growing exponentially in america. 25% of our students in school identify as latinos. this is the new america. we are going to have to come to terms with what it means, what these numbers mean for the future of this great nation. i want to start with my friend tom saenz. the place to start, while we will get to immigration reform, is not with immigration. there is another issue that impacts, concerns, and frankly is causing all of us to be a bit
now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said it's always the right time o do the right thing. i just try to live the right way by doing the right thing every day. we have a lot work o to do. wal-mart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we could tamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [applause] >> hell oh, my name is tavis smiley and i'm honored to be moderator for this conversation called latino nation beyond the numbers. let me ask you to welcome our panel for those in the audience. i'm delighted to have this opportunity to sit amongst these influences. to talk about the issues that are important to all americans and especially in particularly and uniquely to the latino community. but there are so many issues that matter to these fellow citizens that so often we don't get the benefit and i mean that sincerely we don't get the benefit to hear about the things that are important to them, education and uninforming and underinforming and housing and crime and health care and even foreign po
up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had. it is always the right time to do the right thing. i tried to do -- live my life everyday by doing the right thing. we have a lot of work to do. wal-mart committed to fighting hunger in the u.s.. as we work together, we could stamp hundred out. -- hunger out. and by contributions to your pbs stations by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: our country's future is linked to this traverse and dynamic ethnic group. we can no longer paint latinos has marginalized. as this community goes, so goes america. we often hear thought leaders discussing immigration reform. we asked the panel to define how they think latinos are perceived in america. >> i believe the greatest challenge we have faced is related to the inability of society to understand the meaning of demographic changes. the fact that beginning to 40 years ago, the nature of migration together with the changes in the demographic trends, lance us in a situation where we are in it. --lands us where we are end. anhas not given us appropriate environment to understand what it mean
and chris columbus coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. yourd by contributions to pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. rd: with so much breaking news to date including the breaking news i and boston and the crisis in north korea and the budget, pleased to speak to senator bernie sanders from washington. good to have you on this program. >> bid to be with you. >> let's start with boston. i do not know if you know any more than the rest of us. let's start with your thoughts on what happened in boston. >> boston is the capital of new england, that is where i live. the boston marathon is one of the great events in this country. tragedy.eal, real our hearts and prayers go out to the families who have been maimed, people who have
be the same. a conversation with harrison ford, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: more than a decade before the civil rights activists took to the streets, branch rickey went up against a wall of segregation and brought in jackie roosevelt robinson to play in america's then all white pastime. it was a courageous move. all the while driving on the field. rekeyed took on the baseball this movient -- challenges -- let's take a look. >> i love baseball. given my whole life to it. i was a player at ohio university. they had a negro capture on the team -- catcher and the team. i saw him laid low, broken, because of the color of his skin. unfair atsomething the he
job, to make your job easier. and you do a fine job of it. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: after four decades and more than 30 million records solarann and nancy will just inducted into the rock-and- roll hall of fame. the road was not always smooth and some of their conflicts and behind-the-scenes dramas have been well chronicled, including their own autobiography. there is a boxed set, and they recently released a studio album titled "fanatic." let's take a look again doing what they do on their signature song "magic man." ♪ understand he is the magic man ♪ starters, congratulations. a big deal, hall of fame. >> yes. >> does it feel like a big deal? >> it does
. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: it sounds like a fiction story, a teenager at struggling with the harsh upbringing. she spent an interlude at a summer camp run by a major movie store -- a major movie star. that is exactly what happened to mary williams. the woman she considers her second mother, jane fonda. he has written a very frank and more about her difficult upbringing. "lostook is called daughter." havefonda, delighted to you here as well. let me start with this. is sothat your story unique from what most black girls will ever in power, what do you want to take away to be for the reader? >> it is different, but it is relatable to a lot of people. a lot of the experiences i have gone through, ma
us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: i suspect no one of a certain age can forget molly ringwald. then when starring in those films, her first love was always music. she has just recorded her first ever cd, in a jazz album called "except sometimes." here is a small taste of what to expect. ♪ get my man ♪ good to have you back. anywhere, you appear the introduction is similar to the one you just heard. movies. do you ever get tired of hearing that? it happens whether you let them or not. it depends on the day. i think i am proud of those films. it would be a real bummer if i was known for something i did not like. i am really happy with the stuff i am doing now. if those films b
. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: playing jackie robinson in "42," the film that header -- that celebrates the heroism of the man who broke the color role.r is a coveted chadwick boseman won the part. it shines a spotlight on the solid and passionate marriage of jackie and rachel. let's take a look at a clip from "42." >> promise me you will write. >> when have i ever not written? to know that i'm there for you, even if it is words on paper. , you are in my heart. you're getting close now. the closer you get, the worse they will be. don't let them get to you. >> i won't. god built me to last. -- tavis:ow are you how are you processing all of this gecko eyesight couple of predictions
with stephen stills coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: stephen stills 50-your career has taken him from a 60s band the buffaloes ring field to crosby, stills, nash and young to a fabulous solo career. is nows of music captured in a four-cd set called carry on." -- " here he is with the song he wrote for his friend judy collins, "sweet judy blue eyes ." am yours, you are mine, you are what you are ♪ ♪ you make it hard ♪ remember what we've said ♪ ♪ and done and felt about each other ♪ ♪ oh, babe, have mercy ♪ don't let the past remind us of what we are not now ♪ ♪ i am not dreaming ♪ i am yours, you are mine, you are what you are ♪
obama speaking at the dedication as the m.l. king memorial, that dr. king memorial. here we are on this sunday. it is 45 years ago, it was 45 years ago on april 4th 1968 that dr. king was gunned down on the balcony. he went down to memphis that week off to stand with sanitation workers who were simply trying to organize a local union, 1707 in the federation of state employees. we were covering the protests and wisconsin. for young people who are thinking it was clear-cut black-and-white i think people should think again. it was founded i think in 1932 and wisconsin dr. king died for that right. most people in this country don't realize or no the i have a dream speech but don't realize that he was speaking i may not make at the mountain top address. he was there to stand with sanitation workers seven organizing. a year to the day before he died on april 4th, 1967 at riverside church, dr. king gave another evidence that didn't give as much attention after he died. the replete every year on dr. king's birthday a federal holiday that was very hard fought for by people all over t
where he was processed, strip searched and examined by a doctor. as we fast forward to today, dr. king's legacy shines through a new era. it's good to have you here. >> thank you. >> how much do we consider today's civil rights advocates to look at the legacy of dr. king and emerge from it? >> it's interesting. 45 years after the assassination of dr. king, we have a framework among african-americans that focuses on civil rights leaders and pastors. what motivated it were religious leaders and they still are a preponderan preponderance. a quaurter of the people said al sharpton, 11% said jesse jackson. people still do look in that direction. i think what's different now is the collective sense of siege and constant siege that the african-american community felt then no longer is operative. you have a different set of issues. it's more defending voting rights and trying to defend affirmative action. the movement doesn't really exist anymore. i think there's still a need for some kind of collective action. >> the siege is dissipated even with the election we just went through where voter'
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 238 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)